60% Of You Think You Have A Good Job? Really?

I got a shock when I saw the headline for the article below:

20130804_114318-1

60% of Singaporeans (63% to be exact) feel that they have a good job (Chart 1)? Are they kidding us?

photo 1

Chart 1

You know what’s the truth?

Last Friday, I wrote in an article that in order to have even a basic standard of living in Singapore, a person who is single needs to earn a starting pay of at least $2,000 every month. For a family of four, each parent would need to earn a starting pay of at least $3,500 every month.

And do you know how many people in Singapore are not even able to earn even $3,500 every month? More than 60% (64% to be exact) (Chart 2).

Slide1Chart 2

Do you know that in 2013, you would need to have a minimum of $148,000 before you are able to take your CPF money out? Do you know how many people in Singapore are not able to even meet this amount? Nearly 60% (Chart 3).

Slide2

Chart 3

In fact, over the years, fewer and fewer Singaporeans at the age of 55 have been able to meet the CPF Minimum Sum (Chart 4).

photo 3 (13)

Chart 4

Do you know how many people in Singapore do not pay income tax? Nearly 60% (55% to be exact) (Chart 5). In Singapore, you don’t have to pay income tax if you earn less than $20,000 every year. So, does this means is that nearly 60% earn a monthly salary of less than $1,667, if you don’t include a 13 month bonus, and if you do, does this means that nearly 60% of Singaporeans earn less than $1,538 every month?

Slide3

Chart 5

60% of Singaporeans feel that they have a good job? Really?

  • More than 60% of Singaporeans don’t earn enough to have even a basic standard of living in Singapore.
  • Nearly 60% of Singaporeans cannot take their CPF money out because they don’t earn enough.
  • Nearly 60% of Singaporeans don’t have to pay taxes – which means that nearly 60% of Singaporeans earn less than $1,667. (Note: some readers have clarified that there are tax rebates for reliefs such as the Parenthood Tax Rebate and the Qualifying Child Relief, as such not all the 55% of non-taxpayers would earn less than $1,667 – but the question is that does this mean that even if someone earns $2,000 or $3,000, does he/she not pay tax because with all the expenses catered to as part of rebates and reliefs, that the person would have maxed out his/her income?)

So, 60% of Singaporeans feel that they have a good job? Are you kidding me? It’s more like the other way round, isn’t it? It should be that 60% of Singaporeans (or more) DO NOT feel that they have a good job, right?

The Straits Times had also reported that, “a university degree is not essential to secure a good post” (Chart 6). Are you sure?

photo 2

Chart 6

How much is the starting pay if someone has a degree? $3,000.

How much is the starting pay for a diploma holder? $2,000.

The diploma holder can barely earn enough to have a basic standard of living for him/herself. But if he/she wants to get married and have 2 children, it would be very tough on them.

And a university degree is not essential to secure a good post? Really?

Why does the government keep wanting to create illusions that Singapore is OK? Why doesn’t the government just fix the problems so that things will be TRULY OK? Increase the pay of the lower-income earners and those who do not have a degree already!

Do you know what else is 60%?

In the general elections in 2011, the PAP won 60% of the seats. But do you know that this is the lowest that they have ever gotten since independence? Do you also know that the votes that have won have been dropping, from 75% in 2001, 66% in 2006 to only 60% in 2011 (Chart 7)?

Slide4

Chart 7

In the next general election, how much further would their votes drop to? 55%? 50% (Chart 8)?

Slide5

Chart 8

And do you know what else their dropping vote share corresponds to? Look at Chart 7 and compare it with Chart 4. What do you see?

The more people aren’t able to meet their CPF Minimum Sum, the less likely they are to vote for the PAP. Similarly, the lesser their wages are able to buy them things, the less likely they are to vote for the PAP. Basically, the more it is increasingly difficult for Singaporeans to survive in Singapore, the less likely that will vote for the PAP.

It isn’t rocket science, really. Treat the people right and protect them and the people will support you. The government can keep putting out such nice and dandy articles in The Straits Times, but the people can feel it for themselves. If my life isn’t good, it isn’t. No point trying to hoodwink me in your papers, because my eyes are opened now.

No wonder the government wants to attack bloggers and netizens. This is what we are exposing. Which is why they will attack our reputation. They hope that if they destroy our reputations, people will stop reading what we write.

But, you know what? I don’t care about my reputation. I write because I want to share what I know. I want to present the truth. I write because I want our lives to be better.

You can make me look bad and I don’t care because life goes on. I have nothing to hide. I have nothing to lose. I lose my reputation and I will move on.

But more importantly, what about you, readers? Why do you read? You shouldn’t be reading because you like the bloggers or support them. You should be reading because you want to know more, and you want to be awakened to the truth, so that you can do something about it. And so that you will protect yourself and those around you.

If that’s your starting point, who cares what they do? I will continue writing and you will continue reading and thinking, because you will want to find out, and you will want to know. And you will be able to make up your own minds.

Enough is enough. We can think for ourselves. You can think for yourself.

Advertisements

4 comments

  1. Mike Zeng

    Thanks a heap, Roy! I always thought so but because of my poor grasp of figures and percentages I could not prove my case to my friends and relatives. With your superb grasp and presentation of the relevant figures in this article and the prev one, you have proven your case (and mine).
    I have fwd this posting to all my relatives and friends for their awakening and edification!

    Keep up the good word. I fully support you!

    • Roy Ngerng

      Hi Mike,

      I do what I can. I don’t have a complete understanding of the statistics as well. But with what I know, I try to paint the picture I see.

      Sometimes, readers have to also point out where I might have understood the statistics wrongly as well, and I would amend it accordingly in the statistics.

      Meanwhile, even without looking at the statistics, Singaporeans actually have know, or can sense what’s going on in Singapore. We need to know what we are getting ourselves into and do what’s right to protect our livelihoods.

      I hope, together, we can inform one another and make wiser decisions as to what will treat us right!

      Roy

  2. sbksim

    Should we do an online poll with the same questions? I am quite certain that weare going to get some real results. Though the online population is not representative of the entire population in SG, it’s worth a shot?

  3. Jasmine

    Did you bother counting housewives in your 60% of people who cannot meet the minimum sum?

    Did you consider the effect of the change in curriculum in the 1970s, which resulted in a lot of Chinese-educated graduates then to lose competitiveness in the job market?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s